Gasoline bad. Bio diesel good… right?

Alright people, I did it. I finally bought the diesel Jetta I’ve been talking about for the last 6 months. With every intention of converting to bio diesel, I drove that baby off the lot gasping with buyer’s remorse. Is it just me, or have Jettas increased in price significantly in the last 6 years even after one accounts for inflation?

I’ve already racked up 182 miles on the thing and I’ve got to fill up soon. Do I dare just take the dive and go for it – bio diesel – all the way?

So, what I’d really like now is to hear from some bio diesel users, especially if you happen to tootle along in a VW.

Any info is greatly appreciated!

8 Comments so far

  1. Banana Lee Fishbones (unregistered) on November 4th, 2005 @ 8:20 am

    I found a couple of things you might be interested in, Miz JuJu:

    * A load of info on the basics:

    http://www.gobiodiesel.org/tiki-index.php?page=BiodieselBasics

    * Now that you know, here’s where to get some:

    http://www.sqbiofuels.com/locations_pricing.htm

    * And here’s some folks who discuss it:

    http://forums.biodieselnow.com/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID=259

    * And what appears to be the regulatory body:

    http://biodiesel.org/

    So check those out! I have a couple of friends who run biodiesel and they say they can’t imagine anything else. I’d like to find out if I can convert what I have or if I have to get something that’s diesel to start with.

    My next car will not run (entirely) on gas if I can help it. Hybrid or biodiesel for me!

    Am I the only one who thinks a hybrid Mini would take over the world? It’d get a billion miles to the gallon and you could park anywhere you wanted!


  2. dieseboi (unregistered) on November 4th, 2005 @ 11:55 am

    i like the idea of a hybrid mini. in europe and soon here, we’ll be offered the Smart Car, a tiny little thing that get’s amazing gas mileage.

    http://usa.smart.com


  3. MerchMikey (unregistered) on November 4th, 2005 @ 7:27 pm

    Call Daryl Hannah or better yet have Willie Nelson truck y aon over a tankful.


  4. Mark Fitz (unregistered) on November 9th, 2005 @ 8:53 pm

    If your TDI is used start with a blend for the first few tanks. Get five gallons or so of bio and fill the rest diesel. Let the biodiesel clean out your system slowly so there are no surprises. Be aware that if your TDI is over a few years old you will need to change the diesel filter (Esquire Motors is a good place to go for this as they are pro-biodiesel and extremely good at what they do).

    Also be aware that in the cold months you want to blend and “winterize” your biodiesel with petroleum diesel. Especially if your traveling over Mt. Hood. Spring is a great time to make the move to straight biodiesel.

    Its a good time to convert to Biodiesel though. There are several new locations for B99 that will be popping up over the next few months, since SeQuential got their plant online Oregon has been very good to them.

    Also remember that you can use biodiesel in a heating oil furnace as well.


  5. Eric (unregistered) on November 16th, 2005 @ 11:32 am

    Hey so have you been using biodiesel? if so, how has it been. I’m doing a persuasive speech on using biodiesel and would like some first hand experience, especially from a recent car buyer in the US. Would be very grateful if you can give some feedback. Thanks.

    Eric


  6. SAM (unregistered) on December 21st, 2005 @ 8:34 am

    biodeisel is good and bad. Yes it lowers emissions etc, but it also means that the rainforests are being destroyed, cos the farms where the boidesel is produced, (in Brasil and other South American countries), are takin over the forests. Only buy the biodeisel if it says it is produced in a sustainable environment.
    “Yazuurd”


  7. adrian (unregistered) on December 21st, 2005 @ 8:37 am

    hi, i used biodeisel for 3 yrs, and it was great for 1 yr, until i found out it cloggs up parts of your engine, and acts like fat in a persons veins. I used a Volksvagen, and nowadyas, when a small bit breaks, you have to buy the whole part of the engine, instead of just the small broken bit. So usin the biodeisel has caused my engine to blow, costing me over $5,000! its very good if you look after your engine more than needed with a standard deisel supply.


  8. dieselboi (unregistered) on December 21st, 2005 @ 10:10 am

    Sam, you bring up a very good point and thank you. yes, the big commercial enterprises have jumped on the biodiesel bandwagon because there is $$$ to be made. yes, farmers are switching to biodiesel-centric crops in order to catch the wave too. it can’t be avoided in the same way that we have raped the land for profits any other time. i think the only thing we can do is to keep it local. if i can either make it myself or buy from a local company who i know is recycling veggie oil, then i can feel good about my biodiesel.



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